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Full text of "Stout Alumnus, Spring 1978"

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UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -STOUT - MENQMQNIE, WISCONSIN 54751 



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By Lee Morical 

Don't tell Jo Ann about loneliness. As a wife, she's 
been there twice, thanks to death and divorce. 

Irma doesn't need a lecture on what it feels like 
to be a 63-year-old farm wife who isn't quite ready 
to meet society's expectations of what a grandmother 
"should"- be doing. 

The meaning of communications breakdown in 
families doesn't have to be belabored, and a session 
on depression unlocks pushed-backed memories. The 
course in Life Cycle of Women presents new infor- 
mation but few surprises. 

Because JoAnn and Irma and all the other trainees 
have been there. 

Having "been there" is the essence of all peer 
counseling, and the Peer Counselor Project /Worn en 
Helping Women at Stout is no exception. What is 
exceptional about it is that it's the first training 
program in the nation designed specifically to take 
the experiences gained from being a rural housewife 
and mother and build them into salable skills in only 
nine weeks. 

Thirty- two women from 29 Wisconsin locations 
have completed the program since it began here on 
July 1, 1975. Seven more are in the current, and 
final, class in this three-year experimental project 
funded by the National Institute of Mental Health to 
train non-urban housewives for paid employment as 
paraprofessional peer counselors. 

How did it all begin ? 

The Peer Counselor Project is heavily derivative 
of my own experiences, both personal and profes- 
sional. It is, for example, as much the result of my 
observations as a working journalist for 15 years as 
it is of my being a counselor for the past seven. It 
has to do greatly with my own experience of being 
a wife and mother and it relates closely to the 
articulated mission of Stout. 

All of these factors came together on a steamy 
August afternoon in 1974 in the office of Stout's 
Chancellor Robert S. Swanson. I had just completed 
three years of intensive work in the development of 
counseling resources for housewives in West Central 
Wisconsin, where none had before existed. I had seen 
the need for someone to bridge the gap between the 
well-meaning but untrained friend and the mental 
health professional in meeting the "little" concerns 
of the housewife : loneliness ; eventlessness ; pre- and 
post-surgical anxiety; fear of aging and death; 
problems of handling time pressure; widowhood. 
With the cooperation of the Campus Ministry, I had, 
in 1971, opened the Center for Women's Alternatives 
(CWA) as the first counseling service for house- 
wives in Central Wisconsin. I had identified the first 
peer counselor, Lorna Gauthier — a wife, mother of 
six and elementary teacher- — -who had gone on to 



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take a degree in hu- 
man development and 
family living from 
Stout and to become 
my colleague in CWA. 
Together we had of- 
fered a variety of self- 
growth groups for 
housewives from 20 to 
90 years of age and 
had provided a series 
of workshops, semi- 
nars, retreats and in- 
dividual counseling. 

It was a time of pio- 
neering: of knocking 
on doors which some- 
times slammed in our 
faces, of selling, of ex- 
haustion, of keeping 
the faith. But it was 
also an exciting time 
which provided us with 
the skills and the data 
which brought me, this August afternoon, to a 
meeting with the Chancellor and Vice Chancellor of 
Stout. 

On their parts, these two men were committed 
to Stout's stated mission of "the development of 
human potential through continuous life education" 
and to community outreach. All three of us, that 
day, saw the potential of the interface between the 
expertise of CWA and of Stout. As we parted that 
afternoon, it had been decided that I would write a 
proposal for the hypothesis with which I had long 
wanted to experiment: certain skills gained from 
years of being a housewife and mother are analogous 
to certain skills required of an effective counselor; 
therefore, selected housewives can, in a short but 
well-designed program, be trained to be effective 
peer counselors. 

It was further decided that if the proposal were 
funded, Stout would provide the institutional support 
for the program. It was and Stout did — ■ and the 
Peer Counselor Project moved into the East Wing 
of the Student Health Center. 

Initially administered under the Office of the 
Vice Chancellor, the Project is now administratively 
housed in the Department of Counseling and 
Psychological Services from which I received my 
Master's degree in 1971. The Project's two training 
specialists, Karla Hoefgen and Sonja Stoudt, also 
took their Masters' from Stout. Lorna Gauthier is 
the technical training specialist, and members of the 
Stout faculty — • John Deutscher, Orville Nelson, Bob 
Wurtz, Beverly Schmalzried and Gene Flug — -have 



taken part in various stages of program development 
and instruction. Jerry Kirsling, psychologist with 
Stout's Vocational Development Center, is on our 
screening and selection committee, and Anita 
Pershern, now teaching in the Departments of Food 
Science and Nutrition and Biology, has been our re- 
search analyst. 

Interaction of trainees — who've ranged in age 
from 25 through 63 — with the Stout student body 
and faculty has been one of the most gratifying 
features of the program. We remember the hesita- 
tion with which several trainees approached the 
classroom and dorm living after years of marriage. 
We remember, too, how they ended up enjoying it 
and how, in each case, the "kids" on their floors or 
in their classes became close friends and asked us to 
"send more peer counselors." 

But the name of the game during the nine weeks 
of training is hard work — • both for trainees and for 
staff. Two weeks into the program the women are 
already heavily involved in field experience, three 
papers are due and hundreds of pages are waiting to 
be read. They are "sophomores" by week three, and 
there's no breather coming down the home stretch 
into week nine. 

They are required to take almost 100 hours of 
Communications Training and Counseling Procedures 
in which they do peer counseling with volunteer 
clients from the community under the supervision 
and critique of peers, staff and the relentlessly 
grinding videotape machine. Group Processes re- 
quires them to facilitate three self-growth groups 
and develop a group experience for potential use in 
their own work. Each woman must participate also 
in three hours a week of supervised field experience 
in a community setting such as the Dunn County 
Department of Social Services, West CAP, or a self- 
growth group for women under CWA sponsorship. 
Another hour each week is spent in supervised work 
with residents of a Menomonie nursing home. 

To this are added the short courses in Limits of 
Responsibility /Referral Procedures, in which rig- 
orous tests must be passed for successful program 
completion; Public Relations, which requires each 
trainee to produce usable news releases and talks 
to community groups; and Women in Perspective, 
for which readings and a paper are required. In her 
"spare time," each trainee must keep a daily journal, 
learn how to operate basic A-V equipment, and par- 
ticipate in weekly conferences with staff. After the 
initial nine weeks, each trainee is under Project 
supervision for one year and is required to attend 
three in-service days and participate in a work 
evaluation series. 

In looking back to December, 1975, I remember 
wondering what kind of monster we had created with 
this schedule. However, as women who had our- 
selves once stood at our stoves stirring white sauce 
with the phone in one hand and a crying baby in the 
other as our four-year-old ran into the house bleeding 
from the head and the new puppy wet on the equally 
new carpet, we had reason to believe that other 
housewives could take the rigors of the training 
program in stride. And they have. Although all have 
had to leave their families for nine weeks, and each 
has had her share of home and personal concerns, 
none has ever let these concerns get in the way of 
her commitment to training. 



The 39 participants in our program were selected 
from among 197 applicants on the basis of qualities 
we had previously identified as being part of the 
repertoire of an affective peer counselor: life ex- 
periences relevant to peer counseling; ability to re- 
late to others in a non- judgmental way; willingness 
to grow ; ego strength and stability, and the hard-to- 
describe quality known as "potential for peer coun- 
seling." 

From the beginning, our two biggest challenges 
have been: Can a woman actually learn enough in 
nine weeks to be an effective peer counselor? and if 
so, will anyone employ her? With 25 trained peer 
counselors now employed throughout Wisconsin and 
with employer evaluations in hand, we are now pre- 
pared to say that selected rural housewives can be 
trained to be effective peer counselors under the 
methods developed by the Peer Counselor Project. 
More evaluation is yet to come, of course. But at the 
conclusion of the final evaluation and report and the 
publication of our findings, we will turn, in Septem- 
ber, to the publication and dissemination of our 
training methods. 

Finding work was an "iffy" thing for the women 
at first. In March, 1976, when the first six trainees 
entered the world of work, they had to knock on the 
doors of agencies who had never heard of housewife 
peer counselors let alone having a line item in their 
budgets for them. But as the months went by, and 
as we as staff and they as peer counselors criss- 
crossed the state visiting agencies and telling our 
story, the picture began to change. As the first 
peer counselors gained employment and as word of 
their effectiveness began to spread, the picture 
changed more rapidly. 







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counselor Irma Donley and client 

Today Nancy, Sandy and Donna are employed by 
CAP agencies in Glenwood City and Wisconsin Dells 
as outreach county coordinator, counselor, and work 
experience supervisor, respectively. Mary Ellen, 
Dawn and Naomi work as peer counselors and Drop- 
In Center coordinators with the Center for Women's 
Alternatives in Menomonie and Eau Claire. Mary 
Jo is a peer counselor employed by Lutheran Social 
Services in Oshkosh; Penny incorporates her train- 
ing into her work with women of all ages as a lay 
pastor in Merrimac. Shirley, Judy and Mary Ellen 
were asked to teach at District One Technical In- 
(turn to "housewives" p. 11) 



Students Cut Energy Use 



Student ingenuity was put to work at Stout this 
winter as a means of cutting energy consumption. 
Because of efforts by students and the staff in 
Auxiliary Services, electrical consumption in dormi- 
tories was reduced by about 11 per cent and water 
usage cut by more than 16 per cent. 

Joe Brown of the University's Auxiliary Services 
office attributes the savings to two factors : a wide- 
spread willingness of students to conserve energy 
and the technical knowledge possessed by students 
enrolled in many of the University's specialized ma- 
jors. "We find when we go to a hall there are stu- 
dents in the crowd listening to us who know more 
about energy conservation than we do," Brown said. 
"There are people in the audience that have energy 
conservation ideas that are immediately applicable." 

Brown also pointed out that in a survey conducted 
in residence halls, 92 per cent of the respondents said 
they would be willing to conserve energy even if 
their friends and neighbors did not. Brown said the 
University's approach to energy saving is based on 
voluntary conservation. Each residence hall sets a 
goal for the amount of electrical energy it hopes to 
conserve. Meters are read monthly and checked 
against previous- records. 

An energy contest was held first semester with a 
$500 prize going to Fleming Hall, the dormitory that 
achieved a 21 per cent reduction. The money is a 
contribution from the Housing office to be used to 
purchase an item for the hall. But Brown feels that 
the energy contest was not the primary motivation 
for students to turn down heat, take shorter showers, 
do laundry in cold water and turn off unnecessary 
lighting and electricity. 

"Our concern is with energy conservation in the 
future," said Drew Garczynski, a freshman from 
Sheboygan Falls. "It's going to have to start some 
place, this is as good a place as any." 

Kit Donner, a sophomore from Minocqua, said, 
"If we do our part to conserve energy, it should re- 
flect on the bills we have to pay. It should at least 
stop the bills from going up." 

The students are being assisted in energy con- 
servation by six federally funded CETA employees. 
(The Comprehensive Employment and Training Act 
is a program to ease unemployment nationally. Stout 
has a total of 45 CETA employees working on 
campus.) They have aided in making technical 
changes such as reducing bulb wattage, putting ex- 
haust fans on timers and improving efficiency of 
radiators. More than 3,000 inefficient 75 watt in- 
candescent lights have been removed from the halls. 

The key to the energy conservation plan, how- 
ever, is student involvement. "You attend meetings 
and you see that students have a say in the conser- 
vation policy in each dorm," Brown said. Not only 
do students respond in meetings, but with letters 
and phone calls suggesting ways of conserving 



energy. Some suggestions that have already been 
used include switching washing machines from hot 
to cold water rinses and removing lighting in areas 
where it is not really needed. "Students have shown 
us they are willing," Brown said. "Their willingness 
is evident and the evidence is right there in the 
meters." After a single visit to one hall by Brown's 
staff, the students were able to cut their average 
electrical consumption by 15 per cent. 

"You would have to have been in the halls before 
and seen the lights left on in all rooms, lounges and 
restroom," Brown said. "Televisions were left on. 
These things are not happening any more." Brown 
said the real evidence is the things you "don't see." 







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Minnie: >Bfecker Heri&el,. who has .served ; :as ^secre- 
tary :; to ;;airfbut >bhe;>of Stout's : presidents' and- 
chancellors;" ;lslcelebrating her 40th : anniversary 

^;waft;the::tJ|iiyersity.^: ;■ " ^^ ; : :,; ; ^ . 

;;V/;';-'I;thih.k.p 

3'ye^had ■ and^ I ' think 'the University has-been 
fortunate to have such capable leaders, one after 

fahotherv" /Mrs; : ; Hengel said. ; "At first ;T naturally ■ 

: was "a bit apprehensive when it was time to, change ' 

5 bosses yjbut: discovered -that, they :. were ;alhgpbdj ; 

-theyihaye: .' tfrhe-gpod ;' or ; they wouldn't reach ;th at ; 
high &: position/'/ ■•'. V. !■-'■.: ' ": 




Minnie Becker Hengel in office 

jriS ^rs.;.-Hengel;rbegan3iher ^ service ;tb;/the ; Uhi- 
^y^rsity^yd&^resMent^Burton E^Nelspm/HShe 
^Hyas";i;later';; secretary //: tpl: President pyerne:/;C.;i 
.Fryklund, President and : Chancellor - William J. 
x Micheels, :: Acting: f/President John. ;Jarvis>>; Acting 

Chancellor Ralph Iverson and the present chan- 
fcellprpRbbert/SP^ 

/ ;::She was 'already working; at "^S^ 

hographer in 1938 when Nelson, her first boss, ap- 
: iPpintetr ! ;her r his;; secretary.; "I really /served as . 
^secretary ; to' the /president for about/six haonths 

before I was officially appointed," she said. "He 
, (President Nelson) was a bit concerned that I may 

have/been .a /litHe-young/to handle/the position,; but 
: that's ^-hOw/l: /got' started. It's /been a great 40 
■]ffiax&"W ^ : - : fi-: i^P'-- ■■ " : "'' -' ? ' : '::'/:- : "% : -y : M'-: ;' ; : :: ".. 

; ; ; ;Nelson ; was president of Stout from 1923 to 
/vl945P "MrSr/Hengel: recalls, him as "a -very /kind, 
fatherly -gentleman." /She/said he : would often 
pei'sphallylendstudentsCmoney when they were in ; 
: need ,and ;hired/one/needy student/as a chauffeur. . 
/"He //was: a stickler /for appearance, and /social 
' formalities . He thought the students should learn 
/social etiquette too 'and the .clerical staff was in-/ 



'eluded yh/ that :i training,":; Mfs;/ : Hehg§h;:said.; 

"Formal receptions .-were regularly held, at/the/pf^'; 

ficial //president's ! residence.;' Prexy:' Nelsph /alsp/; 

was. responsible. for the purchase of Eichelberger; 

Hall,; now /known as the Louis/Tainferf Smith 'resl-' 

dehce.; This purchase was labeled a white elephant/ 

by" spme/persons at that; time." . She vsaidx -that ^ 

Nelson, stayed on past ; retirement age:. because /bf// : 

World/War II. "He stayed on at Stout/during /the/ 

war.and he said as soon as /the war was pvej/.he 

would Retire and that's what, he /did./,VHe /Said// 

When Hitler gave up he would give up^"/ she said.;/^ 

His successor,/ Fryklundp y/hB: : :/was;, 

president from 1945 to 1961, was-a;StQut J 

graduate and a lieutenant colonehin /the/ 

Army Air Force when he was^ appointed. /; 

"The first time he visited:the /campuses : 

president, he wore his colonel unif drip,/ 

and that sort, of scared /some/ :6f:/us,'K 

Mrs. Hengel said.,/ "I think;/he/;/wasj|a ; 

strict administrator, but he was ia/spft-./ 

/hearted, human person inside./He loyed / 

children and the nursery school/class"; 

would surprise him with drop-in/visits : \ 

occasionally. The president really: /did / 

have to be an excellent organizer at/ that: 

time as there were many growth prob-J 

lems." Stout's enrollment more ■jthan 

tripled during Fryklund's presidency^; ';■/; 

She recalls that as Fryklund: would;:; 

walk through the halls of the^ University / 

and "if he spotted a : romantip: cPupie , : 

holding hands he'd speak to them,";she i 

said. "He'd explain that they /weren't. 

presenting a. very good student/ image,,/ 

for Stout, so he w°uld : ask them tp s;tpp/;; 

and they would."/; She pointed out ; that::: 

■ Fryklund /was responsible : ; f0r/;/elimi-; : : 

nating the/: "institutional tan" on the ; ;walls; 'and/:; 

introducing . cheerful /colors 'V;'thr'ougtoiii^/ffiiaS 

campus."-'/.''.' .,'•■-'■ "■ V,""^/ '" ';•'..,. ;;";\;y"/ : ^ ;>v 

- /Micheels; her next boss, headed the/Uhiversity/l 

from 1961 to 1972. ; ''Because he wM- a///Stoiiff 

, graduate /and, a Menomonie . native^I^had'/heard' ' 

: quitea bit about Bud -Micheels before I met/hirh;";^ 

she said. "Everything we heard was that/he. wasp 

a likeable person, sol had a good feeling about the */ 

prospects of serving "as his secretary,", "She/zdes'-K 

cribed Micheels as "a very friendly,: outgoing- per~s. 

spn'^with an "excellent" sense: of humprS/P/S;//;;/" 

: :;/: Mrs./: Hengel said; she knew : Swahsbny;://her/: 

present boss, when he was a student at:StOut./"fie >v 

mentioned to someone the other .:.day'.-that'-'/i;.'gia'y.#'^. 

him his first job," she said. "He came into;- the; 

; President's office : when he was a student, applying';:; 

for a part-time job; we had had ' a request/Jf OT^a/; 

student /to put; up storm windows,; so I sent.hirn/; 

out on that assignment. She also remembers: that;/ 

she typed his doctor's thesis. She '-/describes/.; 

Swanson as "a hard worker" and "a dedicated/ 

person." \ - ■P.;:^' v'-i^v- 

. "Everything about him is calm and organized," /r 

she said.- "''".- ;// V: /'.; : ;: 5 ; /:/■/: 



Fashion Merchandising 

Business Experience On Campus 



Fashion merchandising majors at Stout are getting business 
experience through two student-operated stores on campus. 

Each student in the major serves in such functions as 
buyer, advertising manager, personal manager and stock 
coordinator. One shop, the Niche, specializes in gifts for the 
home, while a second business, Niche 2, offers gifts for the 
person. 

Jerry DeBoer, who teaches fashion merchandising at 
Stout, explained that students earn three credits for operat- 
ing the businesses, spending five hours in the store each 
week, plus three hours in class. DeBoer says while the 
University provides space for the shops in its Home Econ- 
omics building, the businesses are otherwise self-supporting, 
with the sale of merchandise paying for operating costs. 
Most of the merchandise is purchased through wholesalers, 
although some craft items are taken on consignment. 

"We take a 30 per cent commission on consignment 
merchandise and we take a 50 per cent markup on other 
goods unless they are preticketed below that," DeBoer said. 

Some 74 seniors, are involved in operating the shops each 
year. Hours are 10:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday. "We run one major sale each semester to help 
clean up our markdowns," DeBoer said. 

Students learn all aspects of the operation, ranging from 
advertising to layout and display. Each week they rotate to 
a different position. DeBoer said that the student manager 
sets up assignments'and then grades subordinates on their 
work performance, which becomes part of the grade for the 
course. The students determine where profits are to be 
invested. 

DeBoer said that both shops are set up to handle 
specialized items. "First of all, we are not trying to duplicate 
what the merchants in town are all doing and doing well," 
he said. "Secondly, we are in an out-of-the-way location. So 
if we did not have unique products, our chances of getting 
customers would be very limited." The Niche features such 
items as linens, napkins, place mats, glasses, plant holders 
and inexpensive furniture. Niche 2 has scarves, handbags, 
jewelry, soaps, cologne, belts and other personal items. 

DeBoer said that this approach to teaching is very popu- 
lar among recruiters from business and industry who hire 
graduates from the fashion merchandising program at Stout. 
"We are helping students by blending academic, general 
education and liberal arts with some simulated business," 
he said. "It combines theoretical and the practical exper- 
ience." He added that while merchandising can be taught 
in a classroom, this allows students to understand people 
management. "Supervising other human beings is far more 
difficult than selecting merchandise," he said. "People man- 
agement is a difficult thing to learn, but the most important 
thing." 

Many of the graduates from the program will be super- 
vising other people as early as three months after they leave 
the University, according to DeBoer. "What they are going 
to be judged on is managing people," DeBoer said. 

Through the two businesses, students also will learn to 
delegate responsibility. "Not only must they plan their ac- 
tivities well in advance, but they must discover that they 
can't do it all themselves," DeBoer said. 











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Class Notes 



1905- 1959 

HATTIE DAHLBERG Dip. '05 re- 
tired teacher who lives in Chippewa 
Fails, may be the earliest Stout grad 
in the country still living. Anyone 
challenging this distinction is invited 
to write the Alumni Office. 

MARTIN J. BRADLEY Dip. '23 is 
asking for names of any living mem- 
bers of the classes of 1914 and 1915. 
Please send them to his home at 3722 
Highcliff, San Antonio, Tex. 78218. 

HELEN NOVAK TRADER BS '31, 
MS '58 has retired to Tuscon, Ariz, 
after teaching at the University of 
New York. 

EARL C. HELVERSON '32 has re- 
tired from Pacific Northwest Bell 
Telephone Co., Spokane, Wash. 

LOUISE LEE HEIDEL '34 retired 
from 32 years of teaching in the home 
economics department of Omro High 
School, Omro. 

RAYMOND PITTMAN BS '48, MS 
'49 is a district representative for 
Lutheran Brotherhood Insurance in 
Fairfax, Va. 

LAWRENCE E. DECKER '48 has 
retired after 22 years of teaching in- 
dustrial arts and 25 years of military 
service. 

PETER JACKSON BS '58, MS '59 
has been named associate dean of 
faculties at Northwest Missouri State 
University. 

DENNIS E. DARLING '59 is on 
sabbatical leave from Western Michi- 
gan University in order to develop 
energy education materials for ele- 
mentary through adult consumers. 

LLOYD RUEB MS '59 is adminis- 
trator of the Montello school district, 
and has been appointed to the Madi- 
son Area Vocational School Board. 



1960- 1969 

DAVID SNEEN '60 is the industrial 
cooperative education coordinator for 
Custer High School, Milwaukee. 

ROBERT M. HIRAYAMA '61 is the 
recipient of the Outstanding Industrial 
Arts Teacher of the Year Award for 
Hawaii at the 39th annual convention 
of the Amei'ican Industrial Arts As- 
sociation in New Orleans. 

JOHN '62 is currently the registrar 
at the University of Maine, while wife, 

MARY WHELEN KEYSOR '64 works 
at Maine Medical Center as a clinical 
dietitian. 

BRUCE '62 and CHARLOTTE 
SYRING BAKER '63 are at home in 
Fennimore, where he is industrial 
engineer at the alkaline plant of Ray- 
O-Vac Division and she is a tax pre- 
parer for H & R Block in Boscobel. 



JOYCE BISBEE '63 is the manager 
of educational relations for J. C. 
Penney Co. in New York and has been 
named vice-president for cooperative 
relations for the American Home 
Economics Association. 

RAY HANSEN BS '63, MS '68 has 
been appointed administrator of 
Moraine Park Technical Institute — • 
Beaver Dam. 

LOUISE RESELD WAKEN '63 has 
been appointed to a two-year position 
on the Community Design Commis- 
sion for the village of Oak Park, 111. 

RUTH KUNZ CONONE '63 was 
named Woman of the Year by the 
Stevens Point Business and Profes- 
sional Women's Club. She is an in- 
structor specializing in early child- 
hood education at UW-Stevens Point. 

NEAL RAGATZ '64 is teaching at 
the Madison Area Technical College. 

HARRIET MAAS SCHOENINGER 
'64 is an education and fashion co- 
ordinator for Royce Fabrics for the 
firm's four Wisconsin stores. 

FAITH ELLISON BERGLUND '65 
has recently opened a library in 
Mosinee. 

ANNE ROSSMEIER BS '68, MS '69 
has been appointed vice-president of 
consumer affairs for Sentry Insur- 
ance in Stevens Point. 

CARL H. RIIS '68 has completed 
his initial training at Delta Air Lines' 
training school at the Hartsfield At- 
lanta International Airport and is now 
assigned to the airlines' Houston pilot 
base as a second officer. 

RON BESCHTA '68 is a licensed 
real estate salesperson for Kroeze 
Real Estate in Waupun. 

HERB CARLSON BS '69, MS '71 is 
working on his Ph.D at Colorado State 
University, Fort Collins, in vocational 
education. 

TIMOTHY DOMKE '69 a member 
of the 1969 championship basketball 
team which went to the national 
tournament in Kansas City, is now 
assistant coach at the University of 
Detroit following a successful high 
school coaching career. 



1970- 1971 

MAURICE L. ANDERSON '70 

teaches industrial education at Libby 
(Mont.) High School. 

JOAN SEVERSON MOORE '70 
teaches social and family living at 



The Stout Alumnus 

The Stout Alumnus is an official publi- 
cation of University of Wisconsin - 
Stout. It is published quarterly. 
John K. Enger Editor 

The Stout Alumnus is distributed to 
graduates, friends and faculty of the 
University. It is entered at the post 
office in Menomonie, Wis., as third 
class matter. 
Jack Wile Alumni Director 



Burnsville Senior High School in 
Burnsville, Minn. 

DENNIS M. PETERSON '70 is a 
senior employee benefit consultant for 
Employers Insurance of Wausau. 

ALBERT RICHARD '70 is teaching 
distributive education at Stout. 

LINDA BALSON REINHOLZ BS 
'70, MS '77 is the new extension home 
economist for Winnebago County. 

JOHN L. STEPHEN '71 has been 
appointed assistant food service direc- 
tor for Hospitality Unlimited, Inc., 
Ripon. He and his wife, SHARON 
MUELLER '71 live in Ripon, where 
she teaches home economics in the 
Green Lake public schools. 

ELIZABETH LIANG BS '71, MS 
'75 is a test kitchen home economist 
for Magic Pan, in San Francisco. 

JUDY ROMMEL BS '71, MS '76 is 
an extension home economist for La 
Crosse County and was awarded one 
of two Grace Frysinger Fellowships 
at the annual meeting of the Na- 
tional Association of Extension Home 
Economists in September. Her award 
was earned for her proposal for the 
study of the effects of energy con- 
servation on the family. 

1972-1974 

DIANE B. GUTGESELL '72 teaches 
home economics at West High School, 
Madison. 

JILL TRZCINSKI GARDNER '72 is 
the manager of Greens and Gifts, a 
floral service in Markesan. 

LYNETTE TULIP JAHNKE '72 is 
the home economist for Price County. 

JERRY WEYENBERG MS '72 
opened the Cross Roads Realty Co. 
Inc., in Manitowoc. 

DAVID P. VANDERBROEK '72 is 
a sales representative for Kearney 
and Trecker Corp., Milwaukee. 

THOMAS '72 and JOANNE CARINI 
HAGMANN '73 live in Onalaska. He 
teaches woods, small engines and 
electricity at Central High School in 
La Crosse and she is teaching home 
economics at Onalaska Middle School. 

JEFF KLAUSER BS '72, MS '77 is 
the senior sales specialist in the home 
improvement center in Wausau's new 
Shopko Store. 

GORDON M. CORRUS '73 has join- 
ed the management staff of Metzker 
Plumbing, Heating and Electric, Lake 
Mills. 

DAVID BRUBAKER MS '73 re- 
ceived his Ph.D. from Southern Illi- 
nois University in June '77 and is the 
executive director of the National 
Rehabilitation Counseling Association, 
tion. 

SYLVIA ROESKE HOFFMAN '73 
teaches home economics in Bonduel 
Senior High School. 

JAMES B. LUISIER '73 is a sales 
representative for Flagship model 
motor homes in Muncie, Ind. 

STEVEN WELLS '73 is the western 
regional sales manager for M-B Co. 
Inc., Long Beach, Calif. 



RICHARD '73 and KATHLEEN 
OTTO SORRELL BS '70, MS '73 are 
residing in Crystal Lake, 111., where 
he is an industrial arts teacher and 
she is a HERO coordinator in Hoff- 
man Estates. 

ROGER SCHMIDEKE BS '73, MS 
'75 teaches in the Oshkosh school 
system and is the only male instruc- 
tor in their home economics depart- 
ment. 

MARVIN '74 and CAROL 
PETERSEN EGGERT '74 reside in 
Minneapolis. He is employed as an 
engineering aide in the logic design 
department for Comten, Inc. 

WAYNE HEIKKILA MS '74 is the 
new chief of police for Menomonie. 

JUDITH C. LEHMAN '74 is a pro- 
fessional interior designer in Los 
Gatos, Calif. 

VICKIE REYNOLDS STANGEL 
'74 is employed by the Fond du Lac 
Association for Retarded Citizens. 

WILLIAM L. ROWE BS '74, MS '75 
is director of operations for Village 
Inn Pancake House Restaurant of 
Milwaukee. 

CAL '74 and SUSAN DESTICHE 
EICHINGER '75 are at home in San 
Diego, Calif., where he is assistant 
manager for Brunswick Bowlers Bowl 
and she works for Analysis/Research, 
Ltd. 

RODNEY THOMPSON '74 is a ma- 
terial planner/analyst for Storage 
Technology Corp., in Colo, 

JERRY M. FRISCH '74 is working 
for Flour City Press Pack in Min- 
neapolis, designing folding cartons. 

KAY BUELKE '74 is the Ozaukee 
County 4-H and youth agent with 
UW-Extension. 



1975 

JAMES is an electrician with Frank 
Switzer Electrical, Inc., Eau Claire 
and BARBARA WALING KING '72 
is a teacher at Teach-a-Tot Child Care 
Center in Altoona. 

ELIZABETH POLNER is the Title 
I preschool/kindergarten teacher in 
the Howards Grove school system. 

JAMES M. VRANA is a technical 
illustrator for Twin Disc. Co., Racine. 

THOMAS J. BURKE teaches at 
Milwaukee Solomon Juneau High 
School. 

JIM EISENREICH is teaching dis- 
tributive education in Weseca High 
School in Weseca, Minn. 

KATHLEEN LEANNAH is teach- 
ing in Julia A. Rusch Junior High in 
Portage. 

JOHN MS and KAREN MILLER 
GREENBERG '76 reside in Stillwater, 
Minn., where he teaches industrial 
arts in Stillwater Junior High and 
she teaches home economics in Forest 
Lake Junior High School. 



TERRY PIECHOTA is the manager 
of K-Mart's ladies department in 
Aberdeen, S.D. 

DENNIS COLLINS is teaching dis- 
tributive education at Mayville High 
School. 

GREGG MESSERSCHMITT is a 
plant manager for Comatic Labora- 
tories, Inc., in Houston. 

JOHN teaches auto mechanics in 
Greenwood High School, while wife, 
VICKIE JOHNSON WATERS is a 
school psychologist for Greenwood and 
Loyal school districts. 

JANET F. BLOOMER is teaching 
at Kimberly High School, where she 
is the assistant coach for gymnastics. 

ADRIS KHAN BS '75, MS '77 is a 
product engineer for the Onan Divi- 
sion, Onan Corp., Fridley, Minn. He 
recently was honored by Twin Cities 
Chapter of American Institute of 
Plant Engineers as the Young Plant 
Engineer of the Year. 

1976 

DAN CINA is a field service en- 
gineer with Electric Machinery Manu- 
facturing Co., Minneapolis. 

PAUL MAULUCCI MS is the di- 
rector of rehabilitation and personnel 
for Goodwill Industries of North Cen- 
tral Wisconsin Inc. 

RUTH GERBER RUPP has com- 
pleted a dietetic internship at Walter 
Reed Army Medical Center in Wash- 
ington D.C. A-first lieutenant in the 
Army, she is now serving as chief of 
clinical dietetics at the U.S. Army 
Hospital in Fort Campbell, Ky. 

DEBBIE AINSWORTH BARTZ is 
a home economics teacher at Bonduel 
Senior High School. 

DAVID SHAW is an industrial en- 
gineer for Amana Refrigeration in 
Amana, Iowa. 

KAREN ZOBEL is a vocational 
evaluator for the Hugh Edward 
Sandefur Training Center. She re- 
sides in Henderson, Ky. 

MICHELL JOHNSON is the middle 
school home economics teacher in 
Ripon. 

BLAKELY L. SANFORD is a staff 
accountant with Haggerty, Ruff, 
Jones and Caulkins, in Springfield, 
Ore. 

SUSAN HARTE is a food service 
sales representative for Oscar Mayer 
and Co. in Ohio. 

TERRENCE KEYSER MS has 
begun work on his Ph.D in psychoedu- 
cational studies at the University of 
Minnesota. 

GAIL TRESS is the manager of 
Susie's Casuals in West Town Mall, 
Madison. 

BRUCE L. HENDERSON is a high 
school electronics teacher in Gurnee, 
111. 

DALE and NANCY SALTZMANN 
KOEHLER are at home in Green Bay, 



where he is an estimator for Loch 
Homes and she is an EMR 'special 
education teacher for Bay Port High 
School in Howard-Suamico. 

JERRY and MARILYN JONES 
CONTNEY '43 reside in Eau Claire, 
where he teaches automotive me- 
chanics and she teaches chair reup- 
holstery at District One Technical In- 
stitute. 

MARY KAY STOLARCZYK is 
teaching home economics at Whitefish 
Bay High School and is involved with 
curriculum development. 

EILEEN STRAUB is teaching 
family living in Central High School 
in Salem. 

MARY SLATKY is a designer for 
Amity Leather in West Bend. 

BILL and KATHY PETERSON 
DAVIS reside in Roberts. He teaches 
industrial arts in Hudson High School 
and she teaches home economics at 
Mahtomedi. 

JULIE DEY is the teacher-super- 
visor for a child care center in Green 
Bay. 

PAMELA J. BROWN is the food 
service director for Minot Public 
Schools in Minot, N.D. 

CHRISTINE LEITZ is a supervisor 
in the food service department of 
Wausau Hospitals. 

DANIEL S. MANNY is Eau Claire 
County's new emergency government 
director. 

CYNTHIA GLAVAN RUPPE is a 
member of the Title I program at 
Oconto Falls. 

BONNIE BECKER is a designer- 
decorator for Interior Inspirations of 
Mequon. 

JOSEPH B. POP is a graduate as- 
sistant teaching in the engineering 
technical department at Texas A & M 
University. 

1977 

DIANNE T. MARTIN has been 
named an account coordinator at 
Martin Williams, Inc., a Minneapolis 
advertising agency. 

NANCY S. DENSTAD has accepted 
a position with St. Cloud Hospital as 
a dietetic trainee at St. Cloud, Minn. 

CARMEN R. SMITH is teaching 
preschoolers at the Black River Child 
Care Center in Black River Falls. 

TOM WAGENER is an industrial 
arts instructor for London County 
schools in Leesburg, Va. 

DIANE SCHMIT teaches home 
economics at Loyal High School. 

CONNIE CHRISTOFFERSON MS 
teaches home economics in Wayzata 
Senior High School in Wayzata, Minn. 

RICHARD C. BUNDSGAARD MS 
teaches graphic arts in Goodrich High 
School in Fond du Lac. 

ARREL L. GREENING is a pro- 
grammer trainee for Mercury Marine 
in Fond du Lac. 



10 

DIANE C-UENTHER HUGHES has 

started her dietetic traineeship at St. 
Joseph's Hospital in Milwaukee. 

JEFFREY W. JOHNSON is work- 
ing in the customer service depart- 
ment of Geuder, Paeschke and Frey 
Co. in Milwaukee. 

MARY B. ARMSTRONG is the 
home economics teacher for Duluth 
Cathedral High School. 

BARBARA JEAN DAKINS is man- 
aging the linen department in Her- 
berger's Department Store in Rice 
Lake. 

PEGGY A. BLAHA is a home 
economics teacher in Taylor High 
School. 

TIM EGGON teaches metals and 
auto in Hamilton High School in 
Sussex. 

MARY ELLEN FLANAGAN 
teachers home economics in Mason 
City Senior High School in Mason 
City, Iowa. 

RACHEL HANSON TORUD 
teaches kindergarten in Augusta. 

KATHRYN ANTOLAK is a home 
economist for Oconto County. 

JUNE STEFFERUDE POTTER 
teaches home economics in Black River 
Falls Senior High School. 

ROCHELLE WOLFE has accepted 
a position with Home-O-Rama in 
Sturgeon Bay. 

FRANK PALM teaches industrial 
arts in Brookfield Central School. 

THERESA WOLF teaches home 
economics in the BosSobel district 
schools. 

KAREN KRAUSE is an interim 
UW-Extension home economist for 
Barron County. 

JON B. REED is an industrial arts 
teacher at Loana High School. 

DAVID VANDERBILT has a man- 
agerial position with the Marriott 
Hotel at O'Hare Airport in Chicago. 

BRUCE KRUEGER is employed by 
Texas Instruments in Attleboro, Mass. 

OSCAR MILLER is a metals 
teacher at Elkhart Lake-Glenbeulah 
High School. 

MARGARET JEAN FELLER is 
teaching art in Rio Elementary 
School in Rio. 

LOIS J. BANGS works in the special 
education department of Sauk Praire 
schools. 

LOIS M. DELWICHE is teaching 
kindergarten in Webster School in the 
Watertown Unified school, district. 

PATRICIA KAUFFMAN DUENOW 
is a management trainee for a super 
market in Arlington, Minn. 

KAY WEBBER THUECKS is work- 
ing with the mentally retarded at the 
Handicapped Children's Education 
Board of Sheboygan County and 
Lightfoot School of Sheboygan Falls. 

KATHY GLEVGARD KRUMRIE 
is a substitute teacher for New Au- 
burn High School. She is cheerleading 
advisor, FHA advisor and girls' track 
coach. 

GARY CHILSON has accepted a 



position with the Vocational Evalua- 
tion Center of the North in Rhine- 
lander. 

THERESA BECKER ROEPKE is a 
dietitian for the Polk County Nutri- 
tion Program for the Elderly. 



Distinguished Alumni 







Musser 



John W. Ruedebusch (BS '41) 
and Nyla Bock Muser (BS '55, 
MS '74) were presented the 
University's Alumni Distinguish- 
ed Service Award during winter 
commencement exercises. Ruede- 
busch is manager of labor rela- 
tions for Walt Disney World Co., 
Lake Buena Vista, Fla. 

Mrs. Musser is an , associate 
professor and chairman of the 
department of family develop- 
ments UW-Extension. 



arnages 



1971 - 1975 

Mary C. Bretl to LEE EDWARD 
ELLISON '71, Oct. 8, Maplewood. 

MARY LOU LARKIN '71 to JEFF 
SCHEEL '73, recently. 

Debora Bergel to PETER C. 
KANZELBERGER.. '71, Nov. 12, 
Whitelaw. 

Jo Hammers to HOWARD PAUL- 
SON '72, Oct. 15, Wisconsin Dells. 

Jane M. Ullmer to GARY JOSEPH 
BRZEZINSKI '73, Oct. 7, Green Bay. 

Julie A. Schaefer to WILLIAM 
GORTON '73, Sept. 3, Sheboygan. 

Nora Lynn Derryberry to MICHAEL 
JOHN LEE '73, Oct. 8, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

MOLLY MAC GREGOR '74 to Tim 
Boyd, Sept. 24, Oshkosh. 

Patricia K. Cowhey to HAROLD 
ERIC DALIBOR '74, Sept. 10, in 
Menomonee Falls. 

Pamela Tesch to PHILLIP BOYEA 
'74, Dec. 3, in Appleton. 

Lynn Marie Vandersteen to 
MICHAEL J. DART '74, Nov. 5, in 
Suamico. 

MARGARET CAREY '74 to LARRY 
S. BORIS '73, Jan. 23, San Diego. 



Sandra Fuchs to STEVEN 
KOEHLER '75, Sept. 3, Sauk City. 

JOAN M. ZIELINSKI '75 to Kevin 
D. Hurley, Oct. 8, Appleton. 

NANCY A. BINA '75 to John W. 
Schnese, Sept. 24, Owatonna, Minn. 

Cynthia L. Learned to RONALD J. 
DRAXLER '75, Sept. 17, Janesville. 

MELODY ANN WACHTER '75 to 
Steven J. Kriefall, Sept. 17, Green- 
field. 

1976- 1977 

ANN FRANCIS SCHLINSOG '76 
to Todd L. Thies, Sept. 24, Menomo- 
nie. 

Jane C. Rindt to STEVEN M. 
JANOWIAK '76, Aug. 27, Waukesha. 

SUSAN LUND '76 to Kevin 
Kadrmas, recently, Superior. 

ALICE M. MACHMUELLER '76 to 
MICHAEL N. FONS '77, Oct. 15, 
Birnamwood. 

Kathleen Van Dyck to STEPHEN 
ZAIS '76, Sept. 3, Shawano. 

GAYLE JO ANNE BRESSLER '76 
to William David Claflin, May 21, 
1977, Columbia Heights, Minn. 

KATHLEEN BIENIASZ '76 to 
William Benz, Sept. 3, Amery. 

COLLEEN RUTH WIEHR '76 to 
Michael C. Gifford, Oct. 15, Menomo- 
nie. 

Karen I. Rachubinski to DONALD 
A. KOLBE '76, Nov. 5, La Crosse. 

Jane Sobotta to DENIS OLSON 
'76, Oct. 29, Arcadia. 

CHERIE REYNOLDS '76 to Kevin 
Greke, July 30. Dodgeville. 

MARY POSTL '76 to William 
Alsteens, Dec. 19, Saginaw, Mich. 

SUSAN MEIER '76 to MICHAEL 
BENES '76, Aug. 13, Cross Plains. 

LAURIE LEE BRECKE '77 to 
PETER KEVIN STUEBBER '77, 
Oct. 8, Curtiss. 

Nola M. Brovold to JOSEPH L. 
COOK '77, Aug. 20, Chippewa Falls. 

DIANE CLEWELL MS '77 to diet 
Pawlowicz, July 23. 

DEBRA L. SMOOK '77 to John 
Sing-Kit Lo BS '76, MS '77, June 11, 
Eau Claire. 

REBECCA J. MARINE '77 to 
William F. Johnson, recently, Me- 
nomonie. 

DEBORAH VOGT '77 to Richard 
K. Winkler, July 16, Milwaukee. 



Births 



1965- 1971 

A daughter, Tara Hilary, Nov. 4, 
to Mr. and Mrs. GARY R. GESZVAIN 
'65. 

A son, Thomas Joseph, April 17, to 
Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL A. 
CHIAPPETTA '67. 

A son, Kevin Thomas, Oct. 8, to 
HARLAN '67 and DIANNE DREGNE 
PEDRETTI '69, Dubuque, Iowa. 



A son, Jonathan Paul, May 19, to 
JAMES '68 and BARBARA 
PAUSTIAN GRAY '69, Greendale. 

A second daughter, Carrie Ria, 
Oct. 5, to Claude and CAROL ANN 
WORZALA MC KINNEY '70, Albu- 
querque, N.M. 

A son, Oct. 31, to Mr. and Mrs. 
PAUL FABY '70, Green Bay. 

A son, Austin Joseph, July 15, to 
Henry and NANCY SMITH KUPPER 
'70. 

A son, Randy, Dec. 2, to Mr. and 
Mrs. MIKE WAY '71, Oregon. 

A son, Michael John, Jr., Sept. 25, 
to MICHAEL '71 and SUSAN STIRN 
STENERSON, Duluth. 

A daughter, Abbe Laine to Mr. and 
Mrs. MAUREY SCHIOWITZ '71, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

A daughter, Amy Nicole, June 25, 
to DAVID '71 and LYNDALL JONES 
PERSZYK '71. Waukesha. 

A son, Clayton Howard, Oct. 19 to 
Steven and CONNIE PAPINEAU 
GOEDE '71, Schaumburg, 111. 

A second child, Amy Lynn, Aug. 31, 
to RANDALL '71 and DEE ANN 
POKRAND ANDREWS '69, Green 
Bay. 

1972- 1976 

A son, Scott Thomas, Nov. 7 to 
LARRY '72 and CAROLYN 
FORTNEY BARNHART '74, Me- 
nomonie. 

A daughter, Karen Rose, Oct. 25, 
RAYMOND '72 and LEE ANN 
STEFFEN ONDRACEK '72, Boulder 
Junction. 

A daughter, Kariann Beth, June 25, 
to Gerald and ANN CHESEBRO 
BRAGA '73, Des Plaines, 111. 

A son, Travis John, July 12, to 
Herb and LINDA S A H L T 
SCHRANKEL '73, Spooner. 

A second daughter, Karen Ann, 
Aug. 29, to GEORGE '73 and NANCY 
C. THWREATT OLSEN '70, Clinton- 
ville. 

A daughter, Leah Marie, Aug. 25, 



to FRANK" '73 and MARIE SALO 
FRYER '73, Lyle, Minn. 

A daughter, Katie, Aug. 28, to 
JEFF '74 and PAMELA SERVALS 
KUNISCH '74, Hinsdale, 111. 

A son, Daniel John, Jr., to Mr. and 
Mrs. DANIEL STREHLAU '74, Ash- 
land. 

A son, Christopher Charles, June 17, 
to CHARLES '74 and CHERYL HALL 
MEEKER '74. 

A daughter, Stephanie Anne, Sept. 
25, to LARRY '74 and MARILYN 
ANGUS COUEY '74, Shelton, Conn. 

A daughtei*, Kelly Ann, Nov. 8, to 
DENNIS '74 and ANN REESE 
BEHRENS '74, Kaukauna. 

A son, Adam Michael, Nov. 12, to 
Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL GOFF '76, 
Lansing, Mich. 



Deaths 



GLADYS KNIGHT HALE Dip. '13, 
Dec. 29, Clearwater, Fla. 

ALICE MC NEIL Dip. '13, 85, Oct. 
15. 

DAISY BEACH WILSON Dip. '14, 
Nov., 1977. 

LUCILLE HARGIS EPPLING Dip. 
'14, 83, Oct. 14, Sheboygan. 

GRACE M. SHUGART Dip. '15, 
recently in Princeton, 111. 

HARRY L. CROCKETT Dip. '16, 
Sept. 22, Phoeniz, Ariz. 

ETHEL ANDREWS WYMAN Dip. 
'21, Oct. 19, Wausau. 

LEO E. SCHMITZ Dip. '23, 72, 
July 20,' Saginaw, Mich. 

CLIFFORD C. CARLSON Dip. '28, 
BS '30, 70, Oct. 21, in Milwaukee. 

SIDNEY ARTHUR ENG '30, 70, 
Dec. 10, in Chetek. 

AUGUST M. HELGERSON, '31, 
Aug. 11, 1977. 

DANIEL GREEN '32, Vicksburg, 
Miss. 

BARBARA SCHUCHTER MARKL, 
'61, 38, Oct. 16, Watertown. 



Housewives 

(continued from page 3) 

stitute, Eau Claire; Ellie relates 
to her peers as a patient librarian 
in a Marshfield hospital. Karen 
and Mary Ann offer self-growth 
groups for women out of a 
church in Appleton and Bonnie 
does the same in New London. 
Bette and Rose are coordinator 
and peer counselor, respectively, 
with the Personal Development 
Council of Marshfield and 
Phyllis offers emotional growth 
groups to low income women in 
the Tomah area under United 
Board funding. JoAnn is spon- 
sored by a church in Portage in 
offering self-help groups for 



divorced and widowed women 
and Irma is a peer counselor in 
Adult Support Counseling em- 
ployed by the Dunn County De- 
partment of Social Services. 
Peggy combines her interests 
and talents in a job at the Area 
Agency on Aging, Eau Claire. 
Deloris works part time with 
wives of the chemically depend- 
ent in Chippewa Falls and Karen 
has just been hired as an advo- 
cate at the Women's Shelter in 
Eau Claire. 

Each of these women has 
woven her own life experiences, 
interests and training into a peer 
counseling style which, from all 
reports, is providing effective 
preventive mental health ser- 
vices to hundreds of Wisconsin 



ll 

women. Each has, in her own 
way, found employment in a field 
which is fulfilling to her. For 
those still seeking employment, 
the potential looks good. 

Suddenly the years of chauf- 
fering and schedule-juggling and 
caring for and listening — and 
listening and listening • — have 
paid off. "Being accepted into 
the project has been the most 
important event in my life," 
wrote one trainee in her journal. 
Toni McNaron, a program con- 
sultant from the University of 
Minnesota, once called this type 
of work "the legitimization of 
common sense." 

But the trainee who probably 
said it best for all of us is the 
woman who wrote : "I'll never be 
the same again." 

Indeed. 

Lee Morical is director of the 
Peer Counselor Project/Women 
Helping Women at Stout and 
founding director of Center for 
Women's Alternatives, Memo- 
monie. 

"" HOMECOMING " 

Five classes have been scheduled 
for reunions during this year's 
Homecoming activities on the 
weekend of Oct. 7. They are the 
Classes of 1973, 1968, 1963, 1953 
and 1943. All alumni are invited 
to return and to attend the Sat- 
urday night Homecoming Ban- 
quet, when the reunion classes 
will be recognized and Stout's 
new Athletic Hall of Fame will be 
started with the first inductions. 
Workshops will again be held 
on Friday in home economics, 
industrial education and voca- 
tional rehabilitation; plus art 
seminars and an open house for 
former music department par- 
ticipants on Saturday. Add the 
traditional Homecoming activi- 
ties, the parade, and the game 
with Stevens Point, and you have 
a weekend that is worth planning 
to attend. 

Hall of Fame Nominations 

Athletic letter-winners, coaches 
or others who have .made re- 
cognizable positive contributions 
to the athletic program of Stout 
are eligible for nomination to the 
new Athletic Hall of Fame. No- 
minations should be sent now to 
the Alumni Director or Athletic 
Director at Stout. The selection 
committee will be made up of 
people from the University, the 
alumni and the community. 




Stout graduate students doused a flaming mixture 
of gasoline, diesel fuel and methyl alcohol set 
ablaze in containers on a University parking lot. 
The exercise was part of a class entitled "Fire 
Protection and Prevention," in which students 



learn to set up training programs for the use of 
fire extinguishers. The course is offered in con- 
junction pith Stout's Master's degree in occupa- 
tional health and safety. 




Non-Profit Org. 

U.S. Postage Paid 

Menomonie, Wis. 

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1978